My Boy Jack Play - David Hague - Revision Poster/Display - AQA A Level English Literature (no rating) 0 customer reviews. It’s apparently written about a sailor, not a soldier (his son had failed though to enter the navy because of problems with his eyesight). Rudyard is preparing him for his interview for the Army. For me it is a debate which takes place in the father’s own mind; a linguistic battle between his rational understanding (that his son has in all likelihood been killed) and the hope that cannot be crushed out of him (the thought that, if his son is simply missing, then surely he can be found). Change ). The only comfort that can be grasped is that ‘he did not shame his kind’. Prospectus, Institute for Social Responsibility (ISR), Faculty of Health, Social Care and Medicine. My Boy Jack (Context, Non-Combatants, AO4 (Haig's description of trench life is typical of WW1 literature, comradeship is a common theme within world war one literature as the soldiers found that they had nobody else to rely on, especially within the battle field.

The juxtaposition between Rudyard and Carrie’s opinions over Jack’s death shows the two prevailing views of war at the time – one of glory, and one of pessimism. Not this tide. Kipling wrote this as a prelude to a story in a book about the sea Battle of Jutland in 1916 and it uses the imagery of the sea and nature to explore the acute effects of loss and grief caused by the death of a child. And every tide; Then hold your head up all the more, Two years later – Rudyard, Carrie and Elsie interview Bowe about Jack, and discover he died during the battle of Loos. – Scene 1 – September 1913 – A year before the war and Jack is at Batemans. Kipling’s determination in ensuring that his son enlists for the war tears the family apart, while the question of what Kipling considers to be right against the sacrifice being made creates many gripping and deeply moving moments in this fine play (Haig). “Have you news of my boy Jack?” L39 4QP United Kingdom However, by stanza two, the writing is on the wall. Act 1 Scenes 6 and 7: Jack is in charge of Irish soldiers who do not respect him. ( Log Out /  Kipling never wrote directly about the loss of his son but ‘My Boy Jack’ is clearly a thinly disguised poem about mourning and regret and also the importance of sacrifice. Not with this wind blowing, and this tide. My Boy Jack Act 1 - Scene 1 - September 1913 - A year before the war and Jack is at Batemans. Although written about a sea battle and the loss of sailors, the ‘Jacks’ of the title, referring to the common title of ‘Jack Tar’ applied to sailors in general; this poem seems to reflect the powerful sense of loss that Kipling felt over the loss of his own son, also called Jack, a year earlier at the Battle of Loos. His son’s bravery in the face of ‘that wind blowing and that tide’, i.e. PowerPoints and worksheets for the play by David Haig, 'My Boy Jack' lessons. – Scene 4 – 1924, seven years later – Carrie is getting Married. The following content has been archived and is available for historical reference. For what is sunk will hardly swim,

– Scene 3 – September 1913, late that evening – Rayleigh enters the drawing room  where Elsie is and they discuss the interview and about Jack going to war.

None this tide, Ormskirk in the face of the terror of war, is his legacy. Each of the three first stanzas of this four stanza piece begins with that father’s questions. Paper 2 - … Rudyard and Carrie are proud of him, while Elsie is angry as he has failed two medicals. Rudyard is preparing him for his interview for the Army. McHugh smears horse droppings on his feet to get at Jack. Although written about a sea battle and the loss of sailors, the ‘Jacks’ of the title, referring to the common title of ‘Jack Tar’ applied to sailors in general; this poem seems to reflect the powerful sense of loss that Kipling felt over the loss of his own son, also called Jack, a year earlier at the Battle of Loos. Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in: You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Because he was the son you bore, It is a dialogue between that parent and the voice of, what? ( Log Out /  This is for the AQA A-Level English Literature qualification. – Scene 6 – September 1915, the Western Front, France – First introduction to Jack at War and he is checking the men’s feet, he powders Bowe’s feet for him and McHugh protests against Jacks orders. Why Study At Change ). “Has any one else had word of him?” – God? Created: Mar 29, 2018.

It is what Kipling deliberately omits from the poem that reveals the depth of emotion felt by the speaker, revealing the lack of comprehension and confusion that pervades the words of the father desperately trying to discover whether the ‘child’ he proudly sent to war has survived or not.
The turning point comes at the start of stanza three. A handy revision poster with summaries for each scene in the play and key quotations throughout. And gave to that wind blowing and that tide! Lancashire Nor any tide, Bowe is shown to have severe shell shock and they tell of how Jack died in the attack in Act 1 Scene 8. ( Log Out /  The Kipling family is still searching for information about Jack several years after first being told that he was missing, which demonstrates the profound grief felt by families back at home. The juxtaposition  between Rudyard and Carrie’s opinions over Jack’s death shows the two prevailing views of war at the time – one of glory, and one of pessimism. Act 1 Scene 1: Rudyard and Jack practice an interview in preparation for an interview with an army recruitment officer, while Carrie protests as Jack is only 15, Act 1 Scene 2: Jack takes his army interview and medical as Rudyard, Sparks and Pottle discuss Rudyard’s works and cars. ( Log Out /  At the end of the scene Rudyard enters and encourages him to move on. The father laments aloud, in broken tones now: ‘Oh, dear, what comfort can I find?’ and the power balance shifts, for the (by now expected) refrain of ‘none this tide’ gives way to a new kind of strength, offered by the rational voice to the grieving one. Change ), You are commenting using your Google account. Edge Hill? The severe shell shock suffered by Bowe shows the audience how many soldiers were psychologically affected by trench warfare.

In writing this poem he highlights the loss of young life across all the armed forces, not just the soldiers in the trenches which are the primary focus of the majority of War Poetry anthologies. The change in Rudyard’s view of the war as the play progress represents the impact of WW1 on the public’s opinion of war.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com. Act 1 Scene 8: Jack and his men go over the top, and the men are dis-organised just before the attack, Act 2 Scene 1: The Kipling’s are informed that Jack is missing, and Elsie tells Carrie and Rudyard the real reason why he joined the army, Act 2 Scene 2: A flashback to Jack and Elsie’s childhood where they are playing with Rudyard, Act 2 Scene 3: Frankland arrives at Batemans with Bowe in response to a newspaper ad put out by the Kipling’s. Not with this wind blowing, and this tide.